When Evidence Says No, but Doctors Say Yes

Long after research contradicts common medical practices, patients continue to demand them and physicians continue to deliver. The result is an epidemic of unnecessary and unhelpful treatments.

This could be turned into a ‘Literature Review on Effect of Chiropractic Adjustments’ with links to ‘Spine’ and others.


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What Pocket Users are Saying

Nir Eyal – February 27, 2017
Danger in habits of thought…

Rakesh Gupta – September 1, 2017
Long after research contradicts common medical practices, patients continue to demand them and physicians continue to deliver. The result is an epidemic of unnecessary and unhelpful treatments.

Gábor Gyebnár – March 14, 2017
“A 2007 paper […] found that it took 10 years for large swaths of the medical community to stop referencing popular practices after their efficacy was unequivocally vanquished by science.”

Endreas Müller – June 16, 2017
Ineffective cures can be long-lived, too.

Claire H. – March 12, 2017
Striking the right balance between innovation and regulation is incredibly difficult, but once remedies are in use—even in the face of contrary evidence—they tend to persist.

Raisa Roo – March 8, 2017
I find this stuff so interesting. Imagine how much our collective healthcare costs would go down if we didn’t do unecessary procedures? In Quebec, healthcare is receiving cuts but maybe we could have more nurses and doctors if we did less tests, prescribed less pills, etc…

Tate Mars – March 14, 2017
So keep changing to a younger doctor? 🤔

Anestis Sifnos – March 16, 2017
When you visit a doctor, you probably assume the treatment you receive is backed by evidence from medical research. Surely, the drug you’re prescribed or the surgery you’ll undergo wouldn’t be so common if it didn’t work, right?

No Article – June 3, 2019
department. Doctors determined that the man had not suffered a heart attack and that the electrical activity of his heart was completely normal. All signs suggested that the executive had stable angina—chest pain that occurs when the heart muscle is getting less blood-borne oxygen than it needs, often because

nurul azyati – May 5, 2019
Striking the right balance between innovation and regulation is incredibly difficult, but once remedies are in use—even in the face of contrary evidence—they tend to persist.

nurul azyati – May 5, 2019
medicine is quick to adopt practices based on shaky evidence but slow to drop them once they’ve been blown up by solid proof.

Theodor Weinberg – September 11, 2017
“The public grossly overestimates how much of our increased life expectancy should be attributed to medical care,” they wrote, “and is largely unaware of the critical role played by public health and improved social conditions determinants.” This perception, they continued, might hinder funding for public health, and it “may also contribute to overfunding the medical sector of the economy and impede efforts to contain health care costs.”